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Fahrenheit 451

Fahrenheit 451

Fahrenheit 451 is an innovative story that dwells on the life of Guy Montag as the main character and is set in the 24th century. Critically, the novel clarifies how literature and books are illegal, and some firefighters have been hired to destroy the materials. Distinctively, Fahrenheit 451 reveals the disruptive nature of technology where individuals are exposed to digital media that does not help in self-improvement. Additionally, there is the depiction of dependency on technology where some characters foster emotional connections to television presenters at the expense of family members. The story progresses into the life of Guy Montag, who questions the morality of his profession as a firefighter when he sees the community being destroyed and deteriorating. As a result, the protagonist decides to transform where he focuses on the rebuilding of the society through the campaign for literature and culture as a rebel with the aspiration of promoting literacy. Among the compelling literary styles incorporated in Fahrenheit 451 is the depiction of various settings that enable the audience to understand the transformation in culture. Decisively, the change in setting affects symbolism and irony as fiction elements in the plot of the novel.

Change in setting is a literary element in Fahrenheit 451 that affects the development of the plot in the novel. Critically, the change in setting enables the author to establish three distinct sections through the life of Guy Montag in the novel. The first phase represents a time when literature and culture were prioritized in society. Also, the first phase showcased a time when literacy was a virtue in the community and individuals engaged in self-development initiatives. Decisively, the change in setting enables a transformation to the second phase, where there are directives intended to disrupt culture and literacy in society (Hwang 596). Under this context, the change in setting is masterfully used by the author to showcase the role of Guy Montag as a dutiful fireman who contributes to the elimination of literacy and culture.

Furthermore, the last stage is inducted by change in setting by the depiction of rebellion, where the protagonist in Fahrenheit 451 questions the immorality of the directives and decides to campaign for literature and culture. Hence, the integration of change in setting as a literary style enables the audience to appreciate the transformation in the plot as depicted by the characters (Hwang 596). Thus, change in setting becomes an essential literary style that provides a practical platform to support various themes such as symbolism and irony in Fahrenheit 451.

Distinctively, the change in setting has been used in Fahrenheit 451 to present an opportunity for the audience to understand the possibilities in the future. Notably, the conversation between Clarisse and Montag is a reflection of how there has been a significant transformation in the community (Bradbury 18). Similarly, the application of the change in setting reveals how the future is limited through censorship in literature, which makes books less attractive to people. As a result, it is possible for the audience to understand why media and technology have replaced literature in the future (Harrison 56). Additionally, the change in setting enables the reader to reflect on the adverse effects of technology in the community as showcased in Fahrenheit 451. Hence, the change in setting allows the practical description of the literature decline in Fahrenheit 451.

Symbolism is a major theme in Fahrenheit 451 that is supported through the change in setting. Notably, “The Hearth and the Salamander” is a title in the novel, which is a representation of symbolism. Distinctively, the title is a depiction of the life of the character in a changing world. From an analytical perspective, the salamander reveals the personality of Guy Montag, who has the capacity of surviving in a difficult situation without being damaged (Greenwood). Through, extrapolation, it is evident that the change in setting is a useful style used by the author that enables the audience to understand the relationship between the community and Guy Montag. Distinctively, by referring to the hearth and the salamander, the author elucidates the resilience in Guy Montag in a transformative society where culture and literature become forbidden. Hence, the use of changing the setting as a literary style enables the audience to understand the symbolism associated with the hearth and the salamander.

In addition, change in setting enables the definition of symbolism through the Phoenix. Distinctively, the Phoenix is a representation of constructive transformation that has to start with destruction. As in the Phoenix, there has to be destruction through fire to rise from the ashes. Critically, the Phoenix is a reflection of the life of Guy Montag, who had to take a destructive path before being reborn (Khan). The path taken by Guy Montag is a reflection of the fire that consumes the Phoenix before a constructive transformation. Afterward, Guy Montag acknowledges the error in his ways and decides to campaign for the establishment of culture by promoting literacy in society. Moreover, the change in setting presents a familiar background to the audience to correlate the Phoenix as a symbol of the life of Guy Montag. Hence, the incorporation of a change in setting enables the better use of symbolism as a literary style to enhance the understanding of the audience.

Irony is a significant theme in Fahrenheit 451 that is supported by a change in setting. Decisively, the change in setting enables the integration of irony as a literary style used to explain various circumstances in the novel. For example, the change in setting depicts irony associated with the actions of firefighters in the utopian society. Traditionally, firefighters are tasked with the responsibility of putting out fires and protecting property. However, the change in setting depicts irony, where firefighters in the utopian society have the obligation of burning books and starting fires to houses that contain literature (Gomez). The change in setting enables the illustration of irony through the life of firefighters in the story.

Similarly, change in the setting is used to reveal the situational irony encompassing the arrival of firefighters at the house of Montag. During the scene, Beatty explains to Montag that he has to destroy his books, as it was illegal to have them. However, Montag responds by killing Beatty to preserve literature (Lee 144). Critically, the change in setting allows a dynamic flow in the plot where the protagonist transforms from a dutiful servant to a rebel. Distinctively, the use of change in setting provides a platform to alter the plot where the focus is on Guy Montag as a rebel who works to promote the preservation of literature. The inclusion of the change in setting is instrumental in Fahrenheit 451 to support situational irony intended to alter the plot of the novel.

Likewise, change in setting is used to outline verbal irony in Fahrenheit 451 that reflects the harmful effect of technology in the utopian society. Verbal irony refers to a situation where the said words differ in meaning as to what was intended by the speaker. In the novel, Mildred explains that she has a deep affection for television presenters and goes the extra step of identifying them as family. However, through the change in setting, it is possible to outline the verbal irony associated with Mildred remarks, which significantly differ from her interaction with family members (Gomez). In reality, Mildred does not have a close connection with family members and disregards their welfare and well-being. Hence, the change in setting between television and real life is instrumental as it enhances the plot of the novel by displaying the harmful effects of technology on the characters.

In addition, change in setting is a literary style used to showcase dramatic irony in Fahrenheit 451. Dramatic irony refers to a situation where the audience has an understanding of an incident while characters remain oblivious. Critically, change in setting enables the depiction of dramatic irony in the plot where Mildred attempts to commit suicide by ingesting sleeping pills. After the intervention by doctors, Mildred is recuperated. However, Mildred does not remember the suicidal attempt and finds it difficult to accept the incident, as explained by Montag (Gomez). It is from this perspective that change in setting enables dramatic irony in this novel. Consequently, change in setting leads to an omniscient presence of the audience to understand happenings in the story despite ignorance from the characters.

Change in setting enforces irony and makes the plot more believable to the audience. Notably, Fahrenheit 451 is a story written in the 1950s when technology was limited. However, the incorporation of change in setting enables the audience to explore imagination and accept the possibility of big televisions and media (Thompson). Critically, the irony is vital in the novel as it enhances a different mentality where the audience evaluates the impact of technology in their lives. Hence, the incorporation of change in setting enables the establishment of a believable plot based on irony and imagination in Fahrenheit 451.

Conclusively, Fahrenheit 451 is an innovative novel that uses change in setting as a primary style to portray various themes. As discussed above, the novel envisions the transformation of a utopian society where literature and books become illegal. As a result, there is the hiring of firefighters to destroy books and literature houses. Distinctively, the change in setting facilitates the description of the life of Guy Montag as the main character before and after the transformation of the community. Critically, change in setting enables the audience to have a deep understanding of the three phases of transformations through the lives of the characters. Additionally, change in setting is instrumental in enforcing the impact of symbolism in the story. Distinctively the Phoenix and the salamander are symbols used to highlight the life of Guy Montag as he transforms from an antagonist to a protagonist who focuses on the preservation of literacy.. For example, the role of firefighters in the novel is altered, as they are responsible for starting fires rather than stopping them. Additionally, irony outlines the disruptive nature of technology where the characters such as Mildred value television characters more than family members. Hence, the utilization of change in setting allows the dynamic flow of the plot in the story through the transformation up to a point where literature and books become illegal in society.